Italy – I Friesland http://i-friesland.com/ Thu, 06 May 2021 04:53:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.1 https://i-friesland.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1.png Italy – I Friesland http://i-friesland.com/ 32 32 American students convicted of murdering Italian policeman https://i-friesland.com/american-students-convicted-of-murdering-italian-policeman/ Thu, 06 May 2021 00:27:00 +0000 https://i-friesland.com/american-students-convicted-of-murdering-italian-policeman/ Rosa Maria Esilio, the widow of Rega, responded to the verdict with gratitude. “We can only thank for the complicated work of the judges, thank our talented lawyers and all the people who really supported Mario because they knew him, because he was everyone’s son, because he was everyone’s. rifleman,“she said after her announcement. The […]]]>


Rosa Maria Esilio, the widow of Rega, responded to the verdict with gratitude. “We can only thank for the complicated work of the judges, thank our talented lawyers and all the people who really supported Mario because they knew him, because he was everyone’s son, because he was everyone’s. rifleman,“she said after her announcement.

The former’s lawyer, Renato Borzone, called the result “a shame for Italy” and told reporters outside the court that he planned to appeal. “This sentence represents a disgrace for Italy, with a jury that does not want to see what came out during the investigation and in the trial. I have never seen such an indignant thing. We will appeal. We are talking about of a 19- year-old boy who was assaulted. ”

Prosecutor Maria Sabina Calabretta had argued that, given the circumstances of the case, the two should receive the maximum sentence allowed by Italian law. Italy does not have a death penalty.

The 35-year-old officer, Mario Cerciello Rega, was stabbed eight times at 2 a.m. on July 26, 2019, in Rome’s Prati neighborhood, near the hotel where the two men were staying, police said in a report. communicated at the time. Rega was pronounced dead later that night.

Elder and Natale-Hjorth were reportedly sold crushed aspirin for $ 80, instead of a gram of cocaine, in Rome’s Trastevere neighborhood. When they discovered they had been duped, police said, the then teenagers stole a backpack from Sergio Brugiatelli, who presented them to the person who sold them the aspirin.

Police said Elder and Natale-Hjorth stabbed Rega when he and another officer attempted to retrieve the stolen backpack. The officers were not armed and did not wear uniforms.

Police said Elder confessed to stabbing Rega, but said he acted in self-defense. The two Americans, who were 19 and 18 at the time of their arrest, said police attacked them first.

Elder and Natale-Hjorth have now been sentenced to solitary confinement for the next two months. Judge Marina Finiti also ordered them to pay the legal costs of the other civil parties and to compensate the “damages” to Cerciello’s family, his police partner and Brugiatelli.

CNN’s Hada Messia and Vasco Cotovio contributed reporting.



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A famous SF pizza chef was called an Italian ethnic insult. Now he gives his name to his new bagel shop https://i-friesland.com/a-famous-sf-pizza-chef-was-called-an-italian-ethnic-insult-now-he-gives-his-name-to-his-new-bagel-shop/ Wed, 28 Apr 2021 22:15:46 +0000 https://i-friesland.com/a-famous-sf-pizza-chef-was-called-an-italian-ethnic-insult-now-he-gives-his-name-to-his-new-bagel-shop/ Pizza pro Tony Gemignani is getting into the hotly contested Bay Area bagel game, and he chose a potentially controversial name for the operation. Gemignani’s Dago Bagel will be located in its new Italian bakery, Toscano Brothers. He said he chose the brand’s name, an ethnic insult sometimes aimed at people of Italian or Spanish […]]]>


Pizza pro Tony Gemignani is getting into the hotly contested Bay Area bagel game, and he chose a potentially controversial name for the operation.

Gemignani’s Dago Bagel will be located in its new Italian bakery, Toscano Brothers. He said he chose the brand’s name, an ethnic insult sometimes aimed at people of Italian or Spanish descent, in contempt after a recent altercation outside one of his North Beach restaurants.

He alleged that a man harassed him about the restaurant’s operations and yelled the insult at him. He filed a police report, then returned to the kitchen and decided to retrieve the derogatory term.

The famous pizza maker said he understands not everyone will be on board with the name. In 2013, a New York food truck that used the term in its name was denied a license to operate in Albany. In 2014 in San Francisco, the owners of a Mexican restaurant changed its name from Bandidos to Hecho after the Mexican-American community called the term racist and offensive, noting that it was used as an insult against Mexicans in movies from the 1930s and 1940s.

Gemignani, however, hopes that telling the story behind the name is educational and has a positive impact. He plans to post a poster outside of Toscano Brothers with a detailed explanation and on the bakery’s website.

“It is important to create this awareness, so that people learn and know what this word means and not use it in a certain way,” Gemignani said.

Toscano Brothers opens May 1 at 728 Vallejo Street, between Stockton and Powell Streets. There, Gemignani, better known as the man behind Tony’s Pizza Napoletana, Capo’s and Slice House, will focus on natural sourdough bagels and sourdough bread.

Toscano Brothers in North Beach will be making New York-style natural sourdough bagels.

Toscano Brothers


Toscano Brothers, a new bakery from Tony Gemignani of Tony's Pizza Napoletana, will serve sourdough and other fresh breads.

Toscano Brothers, a new bakery from Tony Gemignani of Tony’s Pizza Napoletana, will serve sourdough and other fresh breads.

Toscano Brothers

Gemignani said he was working on a bagel concept months before the recent New York Times article that sparked a debate on West Coast and East Coast bagels. Her New York bagels are soft and not too lifted, with a touch of rye in the starter. They are boiled in liquid malt and baked in the oven. There will be plain bagels, sesame seeds, poppy seeds, blueberry, everything, Maldon salt and cinnamon sugar available, with schmears, nova and lox for toppings.

Gemignani plans to donate a portion of bagel sales to the San Francisco Italian Athletics Club Foundation to help celebrate and preserve Italian culture, in part due to the interaction that inspired the name of the company. He also sits on the foundation’s board of directors.

Nick Figone, director of operations for the club’s Italian Foundation, congratulated Gemignani on the appointment of Dago Bagel.

“I think there is a lot of hatred in this world and that it is directed against many races, cultures and ethnicities, including Italians and Italian-Americans. It’s a powerful message and one that needs to be shared, ”said Figone.

He also hopes people will take into account the context around the name: “If we’re only living the headlines and living on the surface, this will only continue as usual.”

The overall concept of the bakery is an extension of Gemignani’s pizza philosophy. He has long worked with Central Milling Co. of Petaluma to create flours for his pizzas, also based on sourdough. And while North Beach is home to Italian pastries and Focaccia’s favorite Ligurian bakery, fresh bread is “a dying breed” in the neighborhood, Gemignani said.

At the bakery, home-ground cereal from Central Milling Co. and a 40-year-old sourdough will lay the foundation for Italian country bread with rosemary and dried black olives, sour chocolate bastards and baguettes. The fresh bread will also be made into Roman flatbread pizzas and panini sandwiches with hand-sliced ​​mortadella and prosciutto. Coffee will come from the nearby Caffe Trieste.

From May or June, the bakery also plans to offer treats like tiramisu, sea salt caramel focaccia bread pudding and panna cotta.

Toscano Brothers pays homage to classic Italian bakeries that Gemignani grew up frequenting, like Colombo Baking Company and Toscana Bakery Co. in Oakland. His mother often used their bread to make French bread pizzas, and fresh sourdough breads were offered at Sunday dinners. He and his brother dreamed that they would one day open their own bread business – hence the name of the bakery, which also pays homage to Gemignani’s Tuscan heritage.

Toscano Brothers is scheduled to be open Thursday through Sunday 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. or while supplies last.

Elena Kadvany is a writer for the San Francisco Chronicle. Email: elena.kadvany@sfchronicle.com



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How is dried pork capocollo made in Italy https://i-friesland.com/how-is-dried-pork-capocollo-made-in-italy/ Fri, 16 Apr 2021 00:18:54 +0000 https://i-friesland.com/how-is-dried-pork-capocollo-made-in-italy/ You may know it as capocollo, coppa, capicola, gabagool. Dozens of names to describe an Italian delicacy: a distinctive charcuterie made from pork neck, easy to spot thanks to its bright red color and beautiful marbling. Martina Franca’s capocollo is a mix between two unique things: the very Italian practice of curing the pork neck […]]]>


  • You may know it as capocollo, coppa, capicola, gabagool.
  • Dozens of names to describe an Italian delicacy: a distinctive charcuterie made from pork neck, easy to spot thanks to its bright red color and beautiful marbling.
  • Martina Franca’s capocollo is a mix between two unique things: the very Italian practice of curing the pork neck and the aromas of the oak forest where pigs roam.
  • Visit the Insider home page for more stories.

Here is a transcript of the video.

Claudia romeo: You may know it as capocollo, coppa, capicola, gabagool – dozens of names to describe an Italian delicacy: a distinctive charcuterie made from pork neck, easy to spot thanks to its bright red color and its beautiful marbling. Unlike ham, the fat from the pork neck makes capocollo a soft, tender, and incredibly tasty cut. We are in the countryside of Martina Franca, Italy, and today we are going to talk about one of the best capocollo in the country, the capocollo di Martina Franca. This type of capocollo is very special because it is made from pigs that feed only on acorns from a local tree, the fragno. And it does not stop there. The tree is also very important in the manufacturing process. Let’s find out more.

Giuseppe Cervellera: The piece of meat we are going to start working on comes from the head to the seventh rib, after which it is boned and processed.

Claudia: So do pigs have two necks?

Giuseppe: A pig has two necks, one right and one left. From a pig, we would only get two capocolli.

Claudia: Is there a difference between the right and the left?

Giuseppe: No, the anatomical part is the same. The important thing is that it is cut from the head to the seventh rib.

Claudia: The part with which Giuseppe works is a large part, about 3 or 4 kilos, which at the end of the drying process will lose about 50% of its weight. The meat is then seasoned with salt, pepper and a touch of Senise chili, a variety of chili from the neighboring region of Basilicata that adds a sweet, smoky flavor to the meat. The capocollo then hardens for 15 days and every other day it is hand rubbed to make sure it absorbs all the flavors of the spices. Unlike other types of capocollo which would go straight to dry-drying, this one is also brined for six hours. But this brine isn’t your ordinary water and salt – it’s vincotto, cooked grape must. Grape must is that thick, cool juice that you get when you mash grapes to make wine. Its freshness also makes it rich in sugar, a perfect sweetener but also a drink.

Giuseppe: Martina Franca was born as a town of winegrowers, we make wine. This cooked grape must was formerly produced during the harvest season.

Claudia: Now it’s going to take a good bath.

Giuseppe: What happens in this marinade? If there is a little excess salt, it will reject it.

Claudia: So just as the salt had to penetrate earlier –

Giuseppe: Now the wine must penetrate to give this unique flavor. After the marinade, we move on to the casing phase. The envelope phase – we use the intestine, the stomach of the pig. Not artificial, it is the stomach of the pig.

Claudia: What is this one.

Giuseppe: What is this one.

Claudia: It’s perfect for the camera. You can really smell the grape must. After wrapping it, Giuseppe pierces the capocollo to allow excess air to escape, firmly attaching a string to it so that it can be hung while it cures. To make sure the capocollo has a perfect cylindrical shape, he first wraps it with a sock and then runs it through a custom funnel. It looks like one of those tools for measuring your suitcase size at the airport.

Andrea: Now, we put a second sock to compact it, to tighten it. To make sure that all the moisture, the excess water that is there now will be gone.

Claudia: Yeah, so now it’s basically tight in these socks.

Andrea: Exactly, to make sure all the blood and grape must and everything else is flowing out.

Claudia: And there is only meat left.

Andrea: Only meat, exactly.

Giuseppe: Here it is, the capocollo.

Claudia: He’s a child.

Giuseppe: That is true.

Claudia: The goal now is to remove all the excess liquid from the meat. This drying phase will take place gradually in three temperature-controlled environments. The first is a drying room, where the meat will spend seven days and lose all of its fluids, such as grape must and blood. The second, a pre-salting room, is a room with high humidity to reintroduce a little humidity into the meat.

Giuseppe: There, we were working with 20 degrees and 50 degrees of humidity, while here we start to work in the opposite direction. We have 17 degrees. We start to drop in temperature and rise in humidity. This means that here we have 68, 70 degrees. We give it moisture back. Fresh air.

Claudia: So from there I predict that in the next room there will be even more humidity and the temperature will be lower, right?

Giuseppe: Yes.

Claudia: After an additional seven days in the pre-salting room, the meat reaches the final destination of its salting process, the salting room. He will stay here for 150 days.

Giuseppe: Real and perfect hardening, in this case. Now our product will be around 15 degrees and 80, 85 degrees humidity.

Claudia: At the end of the 150 days, it’s time to take off the socks to finally reveal the capocollo hidden inside. Wow. Why are you doing this outside?

Giuseppe: Because we, our company, thanks to our families, had the chance to create it in the middle of the forest, in the perfect climate for cold meats, in the freshness of the oaks that we have here in our forest. Thus, by remaining surrounded by nature, we give it added value. Work outside to really get a product of excellence.

Claudia: By the way, I have to say that even though we are outside, the smell is incredible.

Giuseppe: Well, after all the work we’ve done.

Claudia: It’s a paradise.

Giuseppe: We will definitely get great products.

Claudia: So, now it’s dried. Not dry, but dried. He lost everything –

Giuseppe: It has all the characteristics of a capocollo.

Claudia: Here you have three socks. Four socks.

Giuseppe: We now have a product ready to smoke and sell in a few days.

Claudia: So here is the capocollo which is ready.

Giuseppe: Capocollo di Martina Franca.

Claudia: The smell is really intoxicating.

Giuseppe: We can’t wait to taste this. It makes our mouths water.

Claudia: Giuseppe cheated on me when he said that the capocollo was calling us to taste it. We have yet another step to see: smoking. To better understand how much this step affects the final product, we have to go back to the forest so dear to Giuseppe. While taking off all the socks, his son Andrea tells me more about the local oak, fragno.

Andrea: Today we are in the courtyard of Fragni, a large forest immersed in nature. The fragno is a very important tree in Martina, because the capocollo that we produce is smoked thanks to the fragno. It is a tree that gives us the possibility of giving a very good aroma by smoking it. The fragno is very important because our pigs roam freely and eat acorns of fragno. For example, here we have –

Claudia: Here they are.

Andrea: Exactly. [Andrea calling to pigs] [pig grunting]

Claudia: Stretching from the Balkans to Turkey, the Itria Valley is the only place in Italy where this type of oak is found. The fertile soils of this hilly agricultural land, combined with the very Italian practice of curing pork necks, make Martina Franca’s capocollo a truly unique product. After breathing in the crisp air of Fragni’s courtyard, I join Giuseppe in the smoking room, or the “dark room,” as he likes to call it.

Giuseppe: We’ll be lighting the fire here in a moment. With the fragno, those oaks that you have seen and whose acorns are eaten by pigs. We take a few twigs and light the fire to smoke them. This is another typical recipe. Because our grandparents 50 years ago couldn’t add conservatives, that sort of thing. So to keep the flies away, to keep them from getting hooked, they were smoked.

Claudia: Ah, but that also adds a distinct flavor.

Giuseppe: Then it adds our characteristic oak scent. After having smoked, we will taste our famous capocollo.

Claudia: Let’s go. Before they light the fire.

Giuseppe: All our aromas come out. See?

Claudia: Yes, unbelievable.

Giuseppe: Can you smell the characteristics of grape must?

Claudia: Yes, and smoking too. The meat is nice and soft, it is not dry. You can see it from the color, it’s a bright red. In this room – in this cup there is not a lot of fat.

Giuseppe: Capocollo contains 15% fat, just enough to keep the slice moist.

Claudia: It really is a characteristic of the neck.

Giuseppe: From the neck, yes. Now we taste it. [meat crackling]

Claudia: Wow. Mm. Amazing. You can taste the grape must, salt, pepper, spices. But I really like the fact that it preserves that meaty taste.

Giuseppe: Because pigs roam freely and eat acorns in our forest. You can taste that it is a nice, firm meat with a good flavor.

Claudia: Yes Yes. There is also a fresh aftertaste of acorns.

Giuseppe: From smoking, grape must.

Claudia: Really incredible on the palate. Astonishing. So how many days did it take to make this capocollo?

Giuseppe: 160 days.



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How Mario Draghi makes Italy a major player in Europe https://i-friesland.com/how-mario-draghi-makes-italy-a-major-player-in-europe/ Thu, 15 Apr 2021 10:18:42 +0000 https://i-friesland.com/how-mario-draghi-makes-italy-a-major-player-in-europe/ ROME – The European Union stumbled over a deployment of the Covid-19 vaccine marred by shortages and logistical problems at the end of March when Mario Draghi took matters into his own hands. Italy’s new prime minister has seized a shipment of vaccines bound for Australia – and with them, an opportunity to show that […]]]>


ROME – The European Union stumbled over a deployment of the Covid-19 vaccine marred by shortages and logistical problems at the end of March when Mario Draghi took matters into his own hands. Italy’s new prime minister has seized a shipment of vaccines bound for Australia – and with them, an opportunity to show that a new aggressive and powerful force has arrived in the European bloc.

This decision shook a Brussels management which seemed to be asleep at the switch. Within weeks, in part because of its pressing and behind-the-scenes engineering, the European Union had authorized even broader and tougher measures to curb exports of much-needed Covid-19 vaccines. The Australian experience, as officials in Brussels and Italy call it, was a turning point for both Europe and Italy.

He also demonstrated that Mr Draghi, known as the former president of the European Central Bank who helped save the euro, was ready to lead Europe from behind, where Italy has been for years, to the lag of its European partners in terms of economic dynamism and essential reforms. .

During his short tenure – he seized power in February after a political crisis – Mr Draghi quickly used his European connections, his ability to navigate EU institutions and his almost messianic reputation to make Italy a player on the continent in a way. hasn’t been for decades.

With her friend German Chancellor Angela Merkel stepping down in September, French President Emmanuel Macron facing tough elections next year and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, struggling to demonstrate competence, Mr. Draghi is on the verge of filling a leadership void in Europe.

More and more he seems to speak for all of Europe.

“The difference is that everyone, when Mario Draghi speaks, knows that he is not just pushing, stimulating Italian interest”, but rather the Italian Minister for European Affairs of the European Union, Vincenzo Amendola, said in an interview.

Knowing full well that Mr. Draghi derives his influence from his international reputation, Mr. Amendola said that given the potential leadership void in Europe, “you need stable leaders who bring confidence”.

At home, Mr Draghi’s vaccine lineup in March provided political red meat to an Italian population hungry for vaccines and a sense of action, but it was calculated to enhance Europe’s influence. in general.

Abroad, his first stop, in Libya, sought to restore waning Italian influence in the struggling former Italian colony that is critical to Italy’s energy needs and efforts to stem illegal migration in from Africa. He also did not hesitate to fight with the autocratic Turkish leader, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. “With these dictators – let’s call them what they are – you have to be frank in expressing your diversity of views and visions of society,” Draghi said.

But it is within the European Union that Mr. Draghi has shown that Italy is now beating above its weight.

Last week, Mr. Draghi, by turns funny and wobbly but still blunt, kept the pressure on Brussels over vaccine exports. He referred to the “light” efforts in the initial contract negotiations with pharmaceutical companies, and noted that despite its tough new rules on export bans, the European Union had yet to act.

But he also deftly balanced his criticism of Ms von der Leyen’s commission by defending it after Mr Erdogan denied him a chair, rather than a sofa, during a visit to Turkey last week, claiming that he was “very sorry for the humiliation”.

On his debut in a European meeting as Italian prime minister in February, Mr Draghi, 73, made it clear that he was not there to cheer. He told an economic summit attended by big hitters like his successor at the European Central Bank, Christine Lagarde, to “dampen your enthusiasm” when it comes to talking about closer fiscal union.

This kind of union is Mr. Draghi’s long-term ambition. But before he can approach it or tackle deep economic issues at home, those around him say Mr Draghi is keenly aware that his priority must be resolving Europe’s response to the pandemic. .

Italian officials say his distance from contract negotiations, which were completed before he took office, gave him freedom of action. He suggested AstraZeneca had misled the bloc over its vaccine supply, selling Europe the same doses two or three times, and he immediately focused on an export ban.

“He understood straight away that the problem was vaccination and the problem of supplies,” said Lia Quartapelle, member of parliament in charge of foreign affairs for the Italian Democratic Party.

On February 25, he joined a European Council video conference with Ms von der Leyen and other leaders of the European Union. The heads of state warmly welcomed him. “We owe you so much,” the Bulgarian Prime Minister told him.

Next, Ms von der Leyen gave an upbeat slide presentation on vaccine deployment in Europe. But the new club member told Ms von der Leyen bluntly that he found his vaccine forecasts “uneasy” and that he was unsure whether the numbers promised by AstraZeneca could be trusted, according to an official present. in the meeting.

He implored Brussels to toughen up and go faster.

Ms Merkel joined him in examining Ms von der Leyen’s figures, which put the Commission President, a former German defense minister, on the back burner. Mr Macron, who had championed Ms von der Leyen’s appointment but quickly formed a strategic alliance with Mr Draghi, piled up. He urged Brussels, which had negotiated the vaccine contracts on behalf of its members, to “put pressure on companies that do not comply”.

At the time, Mrs von der Leyen was the subject of strong criticism in Germany for her perceived weakness on the vaccine issue, even as her own commissioners argued that overreacting to a vaccine export ban could harm the block later.

Mr. Draghi, with his direct speech at the February meeting, tightened the screws. Much like Mr Macron, who has established himself as his partner – both are nicknamed “Dracon” by the Germans – pushing for a more muscular Europe.

Behind the scenes, Mr. Draghi supplemented his more public hard line with a wooing campaign. The Italian, who is known to privately call EU executives and CEOs of the pharmaceutical industry on their mobile phones, contacted Ms von der Leyen.

Of all the European players, he knew her the least well, according to the European Commission and Italian officials, and he wanted to fix it and make sure she didn’t feel isolated.

Then, in early March, as AstraZeneca’s Covid vaccine shortages continued to disrupt deployment in Europe and increase public frustration and political pressure, Mr Draghi found the perfect gift for Ms von der Leyen: 250,000 AstraZeneca vaccine doses seized destined for Australia.

“He told me that in the days leading up to he was on the phone a lot with von der Leyen,” said Ms Quartapelle, who spoke to Mr Draghi the day after the shipments freeze. “He worked a lot with von der Leyen to convince her.

The move was appreciated in Brussels, according to Commission officials, as it took the burden off Ms von der Leyen and gave her political cover while allowing her to appear difficult to sign.

The episode became a clear example of how Mr. Draghi is building relationships with the potential to yield big profits not only for himself and for Italy, but for all of Europe.

On March 25, when the Commission became suspicious of more than 29 million doses of AstraZeneca in a warehouse outside Rome, Ms von der Leyen called on Mr Draghi for help, officials told the current calls. He obliged, and the police were quickly dispatched.

In the meantime, MM. Draghi and Macron, joined by Spain and others, continued to support a tougher Commission line on vaccine exports. The Netherlands were against it and Germany, with a vibrant pharmaceutical market, was uncomfortable.

When European leaders reconvened in a video conference on March 25, Ms von der Leyen seemed more confident in the political and pragmatic benefits of stopping exports of Covid vaccines made in the European Union. She presented slides again, this time allowing a broader six-week cut in the bloc’s exports, and Mr. Draghi returned to a supporting role.

“Let me thank you for all the work that has been done,” he said.

At the end of the meeting, Mr. Draghi, however modestly, gave Italy – and by extension himself – credit for the measures allowing the export bans. “That’s more or less the discussion that took place,” he told reporters, “because that was the question we originally raised.”



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These villages facilitate travel https://i-friesland.com/these-villages-facilitate-travel/ Thu, 15 Apr 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://i-friesland.com/these-villages-facilitate-travel/ Admit it: you’ve heard of those villages in Italy that sell houses for one euro and you wonder if that was too good to be true. (Spoiler alert: It’s too good to be true.) Or maybe you’ve tried buying one of the $ 9,000 homes for sale in Biccari, Italy. (Bad news – tens of […]]]>


Admit it: you’ve heard of those villages in Italy that sell houses for one euro and you wonder if that was too good to be true. (Spoiler alert: It’s too good to be true.) Or maybe you’ve tried buying one of the $ 9,000 homes for sale in Biccari, Italy. (Bad news – tens of thousands of other people have tried to buy one as well.) Now two more Italian villages are giving you a chance The good life– cheap.

Carrega Ligure, a village in northern Italy, and Latronico, a small town in southern Italy, have announced that they are selling turnkey homes at bargain prices starting at € 10,000 (approx. $ 12,000). These are homes that have been abandoned by their owners, but unlike the dilapidated one-euro houses that have been in the news in recent years, these are ready-to-move-in places.

Located in a pristine national park, Latronico is known as the “village of wellness” because of its clean air and thermal baths. In Latronico, you can view homes on a website called Your Home in Latronico, which connects potential buyers with owners.

According to the city’s deputy mayor, Vincenzo Castellano, local authorities have created the platform to match supply and demand. “People can see and choose the property that suits them best. And it is constantly updated. The inhabitants continue to migrate, so more and more houses are regularly added, ”he told CNN.

Prices start at € 10,000 (around $ 12,000) and go up to € 30,000 (around $ 35,900). As an example, € 12,000 (around $ 14,360) will buy you a two-story house with panoramic views ready to move into.

To further encourage buyers to buy dilapidated buildings, the city of Latronico will not charge you tax for 10 years if you invest € 20,000 in the revitalization of a property.

The other place to participate in the low cost homes program is Carrega Ligure. Straddling the regions of Piedmont, Liguria and Emilia Romagna, this small town in the Apennines has only 90 inhabitants. It’s quiet: there are no bars, supermarkets, shops or restaurants. But there is a lot to attract buyers, including stunning scenery and lots of peace and quiet.

In Carrega Ligure you will find inexpensive houses ready to move in, as well as run down houses to redo. Houses in Carrega Ligure are a bit harder to see – the town has set up a website, but interested buyers should email the town hall in order to get more details or be put in touch with the owners.

But here’s the best news of all: in both cities, prices are negotiable.

READ MORE:

The 20 happiest countries in the world in 2021 (guess where the United States ranked?)

A Car Rental Apocalypse Is Coming: Here’s What You Need To Know



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Italy: rights guarantor calls for reforms to migrant repatriation system https://i-friesland.com/italy-rights-guarantor-calls-for-reforms-to-migrant-repatriation-system/ Thu, 15 Apr 2021 09:28:22 +0000 https://i-friesland.com/italy-rights-guarantor-calls-for-reforms-to-migrant-repatriation-system/ Italy’s national head of detainees’ rights said serious problems remained in the country’s migrant repatriation centers (CPRs). He calls for structural changes as well as “legislative intervention”. Italian ombudsperson for the rights of detainees Mauro Palma wrote in a report on Tuesday that migrants in repatriation centers were exposed to problems which “weigh irreparably on […]]]>


Italy’s national head of detainees’ rights said serious problems remained in the country’s migrant repatriation centers (CPRs). He calls for structural changes as well as “legislative intervention”.

Italian ombudsperson for the rights of detainees Mauro Palma wrote in a report on Tuesday that migrants in repatriation centers were exposed to problems which “weigh irreparably on [their] rights.”

He called for “structural improvements” and for local health authorities to regularly check hygienic conditions in CPRs. He also said that migrants from CPRs should be able to make and receive phone calls.

Palma said the “rudimentary architecture” of the CPRs lacked spaces for socialization and worship, “which also increases tensions”.

Less than 50% deportees

Palma and his team monitored centers in Turin, Rome-Ponte Galeria, Palazzo San Gervasio, Bari, Brindisi-Restinco, Caltanissetta-Pian del Lago, Trapani-Milo, Gradisca d’Isonzo, Macomer and Milan between April 2019 and February 2021 .

In his statement on Tuesday, Palma also said Italy’s repatriation system was inefficient – in 2019, less than 50% of detained migrants were actually repatriated, the ombudsperson said.

Palma noted that the number of CPRs had been increased in recent years, which showed “an increase in the use of administrative detention”. He criticized the fact that new centers “had been created without improving the problems affecting the old facilities”.

‘Legislative changes are needed’

The Detainees’ Rights Ombudsman welcomed the government’s decision to reduce the period during which migrants can be detained in CPRs from 180 to 90 days. (Which reverses a policy implemented in the controversial “ Salvini decree ”.)

However, Palma also argued that more changes in the immigration detention policy in Italy were needed. He said that some 20 years after their introduction, CPRs were still places that had not been well considered.

“Legislative intervention on the means to ‘detain’ is needed,” Palma said.

Migrant protests at CPRs

Palma has criticized the conditions of CPRs – centers that receive migrants who have not had the right to reside in Italy and are therefore eligible for deportation – on several occasions in recent years. In December, he said the long time migrants had to wait at the CPR before deportations “which may or may not” have led to frustration and violence.

Migrants and rights activists have repeatedly criticized conditions in CPRs; in recent years there have been revolts, escape attempts and protests against living conditions in several CPRs.



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What makes a national historic monument? https://i-friesland.com/what-makes-a-national-historic-monument/ Thu, 15 Apr 2021 08:23:56 +0000 https://i-friesland.com/what-makes-a-national-historic-monument/ The United States is not as old as some other countries, but it does include many cultural sites of historical significance. The National Historic Monuments Program helps preserve them for the enjoyment of future generations. Each National Historic Landmark represents an exceptional aspect of American history and culture, according to the US National Park Service […]]]>


The United States is not as old as some other countries, but it does include many cultural sites of historical significance. The National Historic Monuments Program helps preserve them for the enjoyment of future generations.

Each National Historic Landmark represents an exceptional aspect of American history and culture, according to the US National Park Service (NPS).

A historic monument can be a building, site, structure, object, or neighborhood – as long as the US Secretary of the Interior designates it as a National Historic Landmark.

The NPS has overseen the care and preservation of national historic sites since 1960. The Erie Canal system in New York and Mackinac Island in Michigan were among the first sites designated as national historic monuments that year.

The Erie Canal was chosen as an excellent example of early 19th century industrial achievement on the East Coast, while the whole of Mackinac Island – a 19th century summer settlement where, to this day, cars are not allowed – was chosen as one of the gems of the Midwest.

The start of the Erie Canal looks towards Lock # 2, Waterford, near Albany, New York. (© Ian Dagnall Commercial Collection / Alamy)

The NPS selects potential national historic sites through an annual survey to find places of historical and cultural significance in the United States. Once the NPS and its special advisory committee have determined which sites to nominate, they forward a list to the Secretary of the Interior for final selection.

Private property owners are free to accept or refuse the designation of a national historic monument.

There are over 2,600 national historic sites in the United States, and the federal government owns less than 400. About 85% of these are owned by private citizens, organizations, businesses, tribal entities, or state governments. or local – or sometimes a combination.

Even if a national historic monument is owned by a private entity, the federal government can fund the preservation of a monument. Under the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the federal government can license and provide funds to historic sites for owners to maintain the property.

If federal funding is granted, the property is subject to federal laws and regulations restricting changes that could adversely affect the character of the property. If a private owner does not receive federal funding, these restrictions do not apply, although local and state laws still do.

People riding a cable car (© Andy Myatt / Alamy)

Not all historic monuments are buildings or fixed structures. The San Francisco Cable Cars are a landmark that anyone can ride. The city of San Francisco owns it, but federal, state, and local governments all stepped up in the 1980s to restore and rebuild the system.

Even if a national historic monument does not receive federal funding and is not governed by local or state laws, the NPS can check the property to make sure it is still standing and has not fallen into disrepair.

The NPS makes suggestions on how to preserve the property, but the owner has no legal obligation to comply if federal funding has not been granted. Federal funding through grants can help with the upkeep of any national historic monument, which can help prevent it from becoming dilapidated, and therefore less likely to be demolished.

People in a train station (© Paul Brown / Alamy)

However, even if a building is designated as a National Historic Landmark, it can still be demolished according to the laws of its city. New York’s Grand Central Terminal was nearly demolished until former First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis successfully defended her survival to state and federal governments in the 1970s. To this day, tourists and locals alike. travelers can visit the historic terminal which will be 100 years old in 2023.



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Italian Embassy launches social media campaign to promote Italian researchers https://i-friesland.com/italian-embassy-launches-social-media-campaign-to-promote-italian-researchers/ Thu, 15 Apr 2021 07:55:00 +0000 https://i-friesland.com/italian-embassy-launches-social-media-campaign-to-promote-italian-researchers/ Italian Embassy launches social media campaign to promote Italian researchers Apr 15, 2021 – 10:55 AM Italian Ambassador to Qatar, HE Alessandro Prunas Doha: On the occasion of Italian World Research Day, which will be celebrated today, the Italian Embassy in Doha has created a social media campaign to promote Italian researchers working in Qatar, […]]]>


Italian Embassy launches social media campaign to promote Italian researchers

Apr 15, 2021 – 10:55 AM

Italian Ambassador to Qatar, HE Alessandro Prunas

Doha: On the occasion of Italian World Research Day, which will be celebrated today, the Italian Embassy in Doha has created a social media campaign to promote Italian researchers working in Qatar, as well as the network of contacts between research centers and universities in the two countries.

This network is currently expanding and strengthening thanks to the dedication and commitment of Italian professionals. It has resulted in an increasing number of collaborations, projects and shared knowledge, all contributing to consolidate Italy-Qatar relations, improve bilateral scientific cooperation and set ambitious common goals for the benefit of progress, prosperity. and the well-being of local society and the international community. .

This communication campaign was carried out by the Italian Embassy in partnership with Sidra Medicine, an ultramodern hospital for women and children and member of the Qatar Foundation. Sidra’s medical research team, which includes more than 35 different nationalities, is actively engaged in precision medicine, ranging from improved diagnostics of rare genetic diseases to cancer research and new therapies, aimed at boosting the immune responses of patients through innovative approaches in personalized medicine.

Sidra Medicine – says Italian Ambassador to the State of Qatar, HE Alessandro Prunas – welcomes a group of Italian researchers who have studied in some of the best universities in Italy and worked in research facilities and centers first class. In Qatar, they have been engaged for years in the development of projects that benefit patients and the whole community. Let us not forget that their work constantly contributes to the growth of scientific research, which is becoming more and more important in the relations between the two countries ”.

“The Italian Embassy in Doha continuously carries out targeted scientific diplomacy actions aimed at promoting Italian research and, more particularly, the importance of our researchers in Qatar, an excellence of which we are very proud”, continues the Ambassador Prunas.

The Embassy’s communications campaign, which will be launched today with a video from Ambassador Prunas, consists of a series of video clips of testimonials for social media – Twitter, Facebook and Instagram – showing Italian researchers from Sidra Medicine . The music videos illustrate research projects with a strong relationship with Italy and the daily activities of researchers, also focusing on their educational and professional experiences.

“The day of Italian research in the world” – concludes Ambassador Prunas – “is an opportunity to underline that Italian researchers are a symbol of excellence for our country and a resource for the international scientific community. In Qatar, they brought added value to research studies recognized by the Qatari authorities who deeply value Italian higher education.

Sidra Medicine researchers who collaborated with the Italian Embassy to create the social media campaign and shared their professional stories are: Davide Bedognetti, Cancer Program Director; Chiara Cugno, Director of the Senior Advanced Cell Therapy Laboratory; Sara Deola, doctor and researcher; Cristina Maccalli, researcher; Massimino Miele, Director of the Main Laboratory for Advanced Cell Therapy; Annalisa Terranegra, researcher and associate professor at the University of Qatar; and Sara Tomei, genomics scientist and manager of the Omics Core Facility, Integrated Genomics Services at Sidra Medicine.

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Qatar museums sponsor Ro Plastic 2021 award

Apr 15, 2021 – 10:11 AM

In line with its commitment to combine design excellence with environmental stewardship and sustainability, Qatar Museums (QM) announced yesterday that it is the official lead partner of the 2021 Ro Plastic Prize, which is part of RoGUILTLESSPLASTIC, the international initiative founded and organized by the Milanese designer Rossana Orlandi.





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Seegene’s Italian subsidiary secures public procurement for 7.15 million COVID-19 diagnostic tests, largest tender in history https://i-friesland.com/seegenes-italian-subsidiary-secures-public-procurement-for-7-15-million-covid-19-diagnostic-tests-largest-tender-in-history/ Thu, 15 Apr 2021 06:15:00 +0000 https://i-friesland.com/seegenes-italian-subsidiary-secures-public-procurement-for-7-15-million-covid-19-diagnostic-tests-largest-tender-in-history/ Seegene’s Italian subsidiary to deliver some 7.15 million COVID-19 tests to 17 regions South Korean biotech company expands influence From Italy PCR diagnostic industry Seoul, South Korea, April 15, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Seegene Inc. (KQ 096530), a leading molecular diagnostics company, said its Italian subsidiary, Arrow Diagnostics Srl, was awarded the public contract […]]]>


  • Seegene’s Italian subsidiary to deliver some 7.15 million COVID-19 tests to 17 regions
  • South Korean biotech company expands influence From Italy PCR diagnostic industry

Seoul, South Korea, April 15, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Seegene Inc. (KQ 096530), a leading molecular diagnostics company, said its Italian subsidiary, Arrow Diagnostics Srl, was awarded the public contract worth more than 89.3 million euros, the highest volume of calls for tenders in the history of its Italian branch since 2014.

As part of the tender agreement, Arrow Diagnostics will provide some 7.15 million COVID-19 diagnostic tests as well as extraction reagents to the Extraordinary Commissioner for the COVID-19 Emergency, or “ il commissario straordinario per emergenza COVID-19 ”, reporting to the Italian Ministry of Defense. COVID-19 diagnostic tests will be distributed to 17 regions, including Lombardy, Tuscany, Veneto and Liguria.

Seegene, Allplex COVID-19 diagnostic testTM The SARS-CoV-2 test is a unique real-time multiplex PCR test capable of detecting a total of five target genes, including four coronavirus genes (E gene, RdRP gene, N gene and S gene) and an exogenous control ( control of the entire process) in a single reaction, allowing very precise results and maximizing throughput for high volume tests. The diagnostic test acquired the CE-IVD mark in June 2020.

The Seegene official added that with his technological advancements to target multiple genes in a single reaction, he had an advantage in accurately and fully detecting the coronavirus, even with the recent rise in its viral variants.

The COVID-19 diagnostic test is also available with a no-extraction app, which allows labs without extraction equipment and a shortage of reagents to test samples for the coronavirus in an even shorter turnaround time (TAT). The official added that the non-extraction application of the test will help speed up control of the pandemic.

COVID-19 diagnostic tests as well as its extraction reagents have already been provided to From Europe third-largest economy – and has been spread across regions of the country since the start of April.

A Seegene official said the company ultimately hopes to end the deadly pandemic by routinely providing COVID-19 diagnostic tests to countries around the world, and added that it will continue to fulfill its duty as leading global diagnostics company up close. monitor and study the development of the pandemic.

SOURCE Seegene Inc.



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Greece and Spain are safer bets than Italy for your summer vacation https://i-friesland.com/greece-and-spain-are-safer-bets-than-italy-for-your-summer-vacation/ Thu, 15 Apr 2021 05:30:00 +0000 https://i-friesland.com/greece-and-spain-are-safer-bets-than-italy-for-your-summer-vacation/ Photographer: DANIEL SLIM / AFP Photographer: DANIEL SLIM / AFP Italy is lagging behind its Mediterranean rivals, Greece and Spain, to save the summer tourist season. Prime Minister Mario Draghi’s stick-and-carrot approach to getting Italians to vaccinate the elderly and frail before he agrees to open the country up to sun-seekers is morally right, but […]]]>


Photographer: DANIEL SLIM / AFP

Italy is lagging behind its Mediterranean rivals, Greece and Spain, to save the summer tourist season. Prime Minister Mario Draghi’s stick-and-carrot approach to getting Italians to vaccinate the elderly and frail before he agrees to open the country up to sun-seekers is morally right, but it is a risky strategy on economically.

Talk to Italian hoteliers and their dismay is palpable. Take Rocco Forte, the British hotelier, who is due to open his new luxury Italian residence, Villa Igiea, in a 19th-century fortress overlooking the Gulf of Palermo in Sicily on June 3. . Still, Forte tells me that well-heeled Americans who typically make up about half of its clientele are reluctant to book because they don’t know when Italy will reopen and whether it will be safe.

Everything is very different in Greece, which started pilot breaks for foreign visitors as an opening test this summer. At least 69 Greek islands will be fully vaccinated by the end of April. In Spain, the tourist cities of Madrid and Barcelona have remained open throughout the pandemic. The hotels in Rome and Milan have been closed for months.

Draghi wants to use all the tools available to force the pace of vaccinations in Italy, including using the summer season as leverage. It is perfectly justified to prioritize this way, although it is quite a gamble. The prospect of the country missing out on lucrative tourists is already fueling social and political tensions.

Restaurant owners in Rome clashed with police last week outside Parliament over the lockdown. Meanwhile, Italian regional governors threaten to ignore Rome’s demand to vaccinate elderly and vulnerable citizens first, and instead follow the Greek model by favoring residents of holiday islands such as Sicily, Capri, Stromboli and Panarea (a summer destination for the Italian business elite). . The business lobby group Confindustria has lowered its forecast for Italian growth this year to 4.1% from 4.8%, two-thirds of which depend on the success of the summer season, according to Carlo Bonomi, the boss of Confindustria.

Yet Draghi remained determined to vaccinate those most in need first. By taking an uncompromising approach with the powerful hotel industry, the former President of the European Central Bank has given an intriguing indication of how he plans to force change more broadly in the dying Italian economy.

Draghi’s main concern is clear: Italy’s chaotic vaccination program has exposed some of the worst weaknesses of “Bel Paese” (beautiful country). The bureaucrats spoiled the deployment of fire at the elderly. And in some cases, privileged groups have taken priority. Last month I spoke to a 96-year-old man from Friuli-Venezia Giulia who still hadn’t been given a date for his shot, and a healthy 50-year-old manager from a top notch company in Milan that had just had their own. For Italy to have a chance to revive its economy after the pandemic, it must crush the bureaucracy and cronyism that is strangling its economy. Where better to start than vaccinations?

The government is fully aware of the importance of tourism: in Italy, it represents 13% of GDP and nearly 15% of employment, according to the OECD. And if Italians can still spend their holidays at home this summer, the economy needs a country open to the most spending foreigners.

Ori Kafri, co-founder of five-star hotel chain JK Place, tells me that he has a lot of interest in his oceanfront vacation spot in Capri from regular visitors who want to book a postponed vacation. . Yet even he is skeptical of the usefulness of prioritizing vaccines for tourist islands. “The whole country must be free from Covid,” he said. “You have to look at a bigger perspective, as foreign tourists do.”

A peculiarity of Italian tourism is that it is the only European country with more than a million hotel rooms, and most establishments are run by small family businesses. The large chains represent only 5%. Draghi is betting that the best family businesses will have the flexibility to react as soon as Italy reopens, even in the short term. It is these types of traits that have allowed decent businesses to thrive in the chaotic politics of Rome for decades.

But there is also a post-pandemic opportunity here. One of the stumbling blocks of Italy’s declining economy over the past 20 years has been the dominance of small, underperforming family hotels. The country has long lacked the hospitality infrastructure that appeals to affluent tourists from the United States, northern Europe, the Middle East and China.



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